Flashback: ‘Star Trek: The Next Generation’ – “Encounter at Farpoint”

Trek TNG Farpoint 2

An all-new Starship Enterprise for a new ‘Star Trek’ venture…

Starring:  Patrick Stewart, Jonathan Frakes, LeVar Burton, Denise Crosby, Michael Dorn, Gates McFadden, Marina Sirtis, Brent Spiner, Wil Wheaton, John de Lancie, Michael Bell

Series created by:  Gene Roddenberry

Written by:  D.C. Fontana & Gene Roddenberry / Episode directed by:  Corey Allen / 1987

What’s the episode about?

Captain Jean-Luc Picard and the crew of the U.S.S. Enterprise find themselves placed on trial by a powerful alien entity and must prove that humanity is no longer a savage race as they attempt to solve the mysteries of the enigmatic Farpoint Station…

Retrospective

It’s hard to believe that Star Trek’s second –and highly successful – foray into television is now thirty years old.  Whilst the original voyages of Captain Kirk, Mr. Spock and the U.S.S. Enterprise are arguably Star Trek at its purist and best, for many it was Star Trek: The Next Generation that was their gateway drug to a vast science fiction universe and a worldwide phenomenon that endures today.

With the popularity of the original Star Trek cast’s big screen adventures (which hit fever pitch with the release of Star Trek IV: The Voyage Home in 1986) a new series made for an easy sell – albeit a risky one when the concept meant introducing a whole new set of characters and an all-new Enterprise and their adventures in the 24th Century, almost 80 years after the times of Kirk and his crew.

Paramount television felt it was worth a shot and enlisted Gene Roddenberry to create this new iteration – Star Trek: The Next Generation.  Assembling some familiar faces in his production and writing staff including Star Trek producer Robert Justman and writers Dorothy ‘D.C.’ Fontana (who also served as head writer on the vastly underrated animated series) and David Gerrold (mastermind of fan favourite episode “The Trouble with Tribbles”), Roddenberry set out to perfect his vision of the future.

Originally intended as a single hour story, written by Fontana, “Encounter at Farpoint” was expanded into a two-hour premiere at the insistence of Paramount and the reticence of Gene Roddenberry who would add a framing plot to the overall story – coupling Fontana’s Farpoint Station mystery – where every visitor’s needs and requirements are miraculously and inexplicably catered for – with the Enterprise’s encounter with an all-powerful alien entity known as the ‘Q’.  With impressive special effects (that hold up well today in the series’ fully remastered Blu-ray release) and production design the result is, though not a fair reflection of how good The Next Generation would ultimately become, remains entertaining and enjoyable despite some of its hokey execution.

Trek TNG - Farpoint 1

Captain Picard (Patrick Stewart) faces the charges of ‘Q’ (John de Lancie).

In its premiere, the characters fans would eventually come to know and love are not fully formed and the actors not immediately in the ‘groove’.  Despite this and the odd piece of cheesy or clunky dialogue, the cast of The Next Generation turn in respectable performances.  Patrick Stewart is a strong lead albeit the Captain Picard here is a little different from the Picard we see later on, being a more distant and irascible version of the character who happens to have no patience with children (the Enterprise ‘D’ compliment including crewmembers’ families).  Stewart receives solid support from Jonathan Frakes as First Officer – aka ‘Number One’ – Commander William T. Riker as well as the rest of the Enterprise crew, most notably Brent Spiner’s Lt. Commander Data, a Starfleet android who yearns to be human – the Pinocchio analogy aptly drawn on by Riker during their first meeting.

The crew is rounded out by Security Chief Lt. Tasha Yar (played by Denise Crosby, granddaughter of Bing and who would depart the series before the end of the first season), blind crewman Lt. Geordi La Forge (Roots’ LeVar Burton), Chief Medical Officer Doctor Beverly Crusher (Gates McFadden) together with her son Wesley (Wil Wheaton, of Stand By Me fame), Ship’s Counsellor and old flame of Riker, the empathic ‘Betazoid’ Deanna Troi (Marina Sirtis) and significantly – Klingon officer Lt. Worf (Michael Dorn), his race now at peace with the Federation.

As for the main antagonist, John de Lancie is quite simply superb as ‘Q’ and so well received that he would go on to reprise the role in several more episodes of The Next Generation in addition to appearances in future Trek spin-offs Deep Space Nine and Voyager.  Much like Picard, the Q of “Encounter at Farpoint” is quite different from the lighter, more comical version of the character we would see in later seasons and this earlier take on Q is much darker, more malevolent and a credible threat to the Enterprise and her crew which drives the high stakes drama, his ‘trial’ of humanity and their handling of the great mysteries of Farpoint facilitating the morality play aspect of the narrative which Star Trek fans had become accustomed to.

Not forgetting its roots, a highlight of “Encounter at Farpoint” is a cameo from DeForest Kelley as the elderly (human life expectancy greatly increased by the 24th Century), even more cantankerous Admiral McCoy in a wonderful little sequence between McCoy and Data that hands over the baton from one generation to the other and is a real treat for fans.

Beyond “Encounter at Farpoint”, the first season of Star Trek: The Next Generation was a little shaky and uncertain but things began to improve in its sophomore year (which saw the introduction of iconic villains the Borg) and further refined with changes to the writing staff in the third season which saw the series become more character focused, Star Trek’s return to television would prove to be a huge success and The Next Generation would run for seven seasons (a total of 178 episodes) and spawn four feature films.  Along the way it would gain Whoopi Goldberg as a recurring guest star, pick up numerous Emmy Awards (as well as being nominated for several more – including Outstanding Drama Series in 1994) and launch a golden age of small screen science fiction.  Star Trek: The Next Generation demonstrated that the appeal and durability of the franchise was strong and is a series that continues to be loved all these years later.

Geek fact!  Riker and Troi were based on officers Decker and Ilia, characters who were to be part of the aborted 1970s Star Trek: Phase II series.  They would eventually be portrayed by Stephen Collins and Persis Khambatta in Star Trek: The Motion Picture.

Trek TNG - Farpoint 3

The cast of ‘Star Trek: The Next Generation’ as they were in 1987.

12 thoughts on “Flashback: ‘Star Trek: The Next Generation’ – “Encounter at Farpoint”

  1. Excellent and insightful piece! Can’t beat a bit of the Next Generation although I do find the first season difficult to watch as they are still finding the characters and their uniforms are literally just a piece of thin silk! But still great non the less! Especially as the seasons continue! And what classic sci-fi it is! Who could forget when Q first flung the Enterprise into Borg space, the death of Lt Yar (and her second and more fitting death later on)! I personally prefer Next Generation above all other seasons however I’m currently doing Voyager rewatching at present and that is quickly rising to the top! However Next Generation is what a grew up on but I must admit it is a shame Enterprise didn’t get a chance to show its full potential. I believe that could of been a major hit had it time to breath!
    Bless you Scotty GO SULU!!

    • Thanks for your thoughts Alex, it’s great to hear about your own personal enjoyment of the Star Trek franchise (check out Discovery if you haven’t already).

      I love all of the series and I rate Next Gen very highly, yet in the end nothing will ever beat the classic original!

  2. Wonderful insight into Star Trek the Next Generation’s 1st episode and the revival of the series. While season 1 wasn’t the strongest, it did have its moments, and paved the way for some awesome seasons! 🙂

  3. Nice retrospective man! Fun to read this since I only watched this episode a few months ago. I’m watching through TNG currently but I’m only a season in and I agree, it’s shaky. I’m excited for when things pick up like everyone says.

  4. Great look back at TNG’s pilot episode, which is 30 years old now (!). The episode was sort of a mixed bag because it seemed unbalanced. That was because the original script was only supposed to be for a one hour episode but the studios demanded that it be expanded, and that is why we got Q. That was a good thing, because his scenes were the most memorable in the pilot. Yes, TNG had a bumpy first season (as did most of the other Treks), but it improved greatly as it went along.

    • Thanks for the kind words! I’ve always had a soft spot for “Encounter at Farpoint”, mainly because I experienced it the first time around at a very young age when I recall already being a fan of Trek!

      It’s funny how the modern Trek series all seemed to have bumpy starts, I feel Discovery is fairing better in that regard so great that it’s been picked up for a second – (albeit sadly still restricted to CBS All Access for viewers in the States).

  5. Always so impressed by the info you share about these classics. So much that happens behind the scenes sure does play a big role on the production itself and the quality too. Nice to also see how you don’t remain blind to flaws, even if you’re a MEGA huge fan of the franchise, but it’s definitely good to hear that it gets better. I can’t say I’ve seen episodes of this particular series but I’ve seen episodes with this cast, that’s for sure. Great stuff, Chris!

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