It’s a Classic: ‘Star Trek: The Next Generation’ – “Yesterday’s Enterprise”

Looking at some of the best pop culture offerings in film, TV and comics…

“Let’s make sure that history never forgets the name…Enterprise”

Recurring guest star Whoopi Goldberg, a key component in the success of “Yesterday’s Enterprise” (image credit: ViacomCBS).

Year:  1990

Starring:  Patrick Stewart, Jonathan Frakes, LeVar Burton, Michael Dorn, Gates McFadden, Marina Sirtis, Brent Spiner, Wil Wheaton, Denise Crosby, Christopher McDonald, Tricia O’Neil, Whoopi Goldberg

Director:  David Carson / written by:  Ira Steven Behr, Richard Manning, Hans Beimler, Ronald D. Moore (from a story by Trent Christopher Ganino & Eric A. Stillwell) / series created by:  Gene Roddenberry

What’s it about?

The forbearer to the current U.S.S. Enterprise is brought 22 years into the future via a temporal rift and changes the flow of history, creating an alternate timeline where the Federation is close to defeat in a war against the Klingon Empire…

In review:  why it’s a classic

Ask any Star Trek fan about their favourite episodes and it’s likely that many would include “Yesterday’s Enterprise” on their list – there’s no argument that it’s not just an outstanding instalment of Star Trek: The Next Generation but a gripping piece of science fiction drama in its own right.  From a story by Tent Christopher Ganino and Eric A. Stillwell, “Yesterday’s Enterprise” sees Captain Picard and the crew of the U.S.S. Enterprise ‘D’ confronted with the preceding Enterprise ‘C’ which appears in the present, causing devastating changes to the timeline with the United Federation of Planets on the losing side in a war with the Klingon Empire.  With history recording that the Enterprise C disappeared during a battle to save a Klingon outpost from destruction by Romulan warships and Guinan sensing that something is not right, Picard and his crew believe that their only hope is for the previous Enterprise to return to its own time where the selfless sacrifice of the ship and its crew, seen by the Klingons as an honourable act, could avert a terrible conflict.

A thrilling and engaging story, “Yesterday’s Enterprise” is also iconic for facilitating a guest return for Denise Crosby as Lt. Tasha Yar, who was killed back in “Skin of Evil” in the first season of The Next Generation.  The teleplay’s writers include Ira Steven Behr, future writer and showrunner of Star Trek: Deep Space Nine and Ronald D. Moore, who would go on to co-write feature films Star Trek: Generations and Star Trek: First Contact (and subsequently develop the reimagined Battlestar Galactica series) and their presence is heavily felt with a strong focus on characterisation and statements of morality, qualities that lift “Yesterday’s Enterprise” (and for that matter, any great Star Trek episode) above its core SF concept.  It’s through the darker and more hopeless scenario of a deadly and costly war that we appreciate the altruistic values of the Federation as we know it and that the brave acts of a few can benefit the many.

Denise Crosby returns as Tasha Yar in “Yesterday’s Enterprise”, also featuring Christopher McDonald as Lt. Castillo (image credit: ViacomCBS).

“Yesterday’s Enterprise” boasts a reliably strong performance from Patrick Stewart, at this point in the series he is fully invested and committed to the role of Captain Picard and gets to add a subtle shade of grit to his character who in the altered timeline is a military commander as opposed to an explorer and diplomat.  The regular supporting cast all play smaller but significant parts with Brent Spiner’s Data being a particular standout, but it’s arguably the guest stars who really enhance “Yesterday’s Enterprise”.  Denise Crosby’s return is a welcome one and she is provided with meaningful material, Christopher McDonald delivers a likeable performance as Enterprise C helmsman Lt. Castillo (and sharing great chemistry with Crosby, essential for the romantic bond that develops between their characters) and Tricia O’Neil brings authority to the role of the Enterprise C’s captain, Rachel Garrett.  Yet, it’s Whoopi Goldberg who shines the most – her appearances as the mysterious and noble Guinan always add significantly to any episode of Star Trek: The Next Generation but her portrayal in “Yesterday’s Enterprise” is particularly impressive with a passionate and layered performance.  Goldberg’s scene with Stewart’s Picard in which she pleads that the Enterprise is not supposed to be a ship of war, but a ship of peace is especially poignant and really captures the heart and soul of Star Trek.

David Carson’s direction is skilled and attentive, his staging of scenes and positioning of the actors together with the use of various angles and close-ups draw the viewer further into the drama.  Carson is also adept at cranking up the pace as he executes tense and energetic action scenes and it’s no surprise that Carson (whose first credit for Star Trek: The Next Generation was “The Enemy”, from earlier in the third season) would be called on again to helm further Star Trek episodes, including the premiere of Star Trek: Deep Space Nine and also The Next Generation’s first big screen outing, 1994’s Star Trek: Generations.

As exciting as it is emotionally impactful, “Yesterday’s Enterprise” is yet another example of Star Trek at its best and an exemplary piece of storytelling that continues to resonate over thirty years later.

Standout moment

Learning from Guinan that she died a senseless death in the original timeline, Tasha Yar confronts a conflicted Captain Picard with a request to transfer to the Enterprise C and face a potentially more gallant fate…

Geek fact!

Tricia O’Neil would return to Star Trek again with guest roles as a Klingon scientist in sixth season TNG outing “Suspicions” and as a Cardassian military observer in the DS9 episode “Defiant”.

If you like this then check out…

Star Trek: Voyager – “Timeless” : fifteen years after the loss of the U.S.S. Voyager during a daring attempt to return home, former officer Harry Kim plans to alter history and prevent the disaster from ever occurring.

Image(s) used herein are utilised for illustrative purposes only and remain the property of the copyright owner(s).

Flashback: ‘Battlestar Galactica’ – “Saga of a Star World”

Looking back at the epic series premiere for Glen A. Larson’s SF TV cult classic…

BSG - Saga

Epic SF on the small screen: Richard Hatch, Lorne Greene and Dirk Benedict lead the cast of the original ‘Battlestar Galactica’ (image credit: Universal, used for illustrative purposes only).

Year:  1978

Starring:  Lorne Greene, Richard Hatch, Dirk Benedict, John Colicos, Terry Carter, Herbert Jefferson Jr, Jane Seymour, Maren Jensen, Laurette Spang, Noah Hathaway

Series created by:  Glen A. Larson

Written by:  Glen A. Larson / Episode directed by:  Richard A. Colla

What’s it about?

As the Twelve Colonies of Man prepare to establish an armistice with the Cylon Empire, the crew of the Battlestar Galactica discover that a massive attack is about to be unleashed…

Retrospective/review

Following the cultural explosion of Star Wars in 1977, audiences were hungry for epic science fiction whether it might be on the large or small screen.  Premiering in September 1978, Glen A. Larson’s Battlestar Galactica brought grand Star Wars style space opera to television, launching with the triple-length series opener “Saga of a Star World” which sees the Twelve Colonies of Man on the threshold of peace with the machine race known as the Cylons, who ultimately mount a devastating surprise attack, forcing survivors to flee their home star system.

Heading up the cast is Lorne Greene as the wise and noble Adama, commander of the ‘Battlestar’ Galactica who finds himself leading a fugitive caravan of ships carrying colony survivors away from the Cylon aggression.  Adama, ably supported by Terry Carter’s Colonel Tigh, brings hope to the remaining people of the Twelve Colonies as he announces his intention to lead them on a journey to seek out the fabled thirteenth Colony of Man…a place called ‘Earth’.  This quest drives the core mythology of “Saga of a Star World” and the rest of series as it unfolds against the backdrop of science fiction action and adventure.

Playing Adama’s son and chief pilot of the Galactica’s Viper fighter squadron, Apollo, is Richard Hatch who would receive a Golden Globe nomination for his role and would go on to portray the terrorist Tom Zarek in Ronald D. Moore’s 21st Century reimagining of Battlestar Galactica.  Hatch (who passed away last year) gives a committed performance and Larson’s script serves him well as he forms a relationship with Serina (Jane Seymour) and becomes a surrogate father to her son, Boxey (Noah Hathaway).

Another standout character (and probably the show’s most popular) is hotshot Viper pilot, lady’s man and Apollo’s best friend, Lt. Starbuck – played by future star of The A-Team Dirk Benedict.  The brotherly camaraderie between the two is a highlight of the original Battlestar and enriches the feeling of family between the principle characters, bolstered further by Hebert Jefferson Jr’s Lt. Boomer.  Despite the tragic circumstances that play out in “Saga of a Star World”, there’s still some light relief – principally Starbuck’s entanglement in a love triangle with Adama’s daughter Athena (Maren Jensen) and the enchanting Cassiopeia (Laurette Spang).

Adding to the Cylon threat is the treacherous Baltar (the excellent John Colicos, who would reappear throughout the series), whose collaboration with the Cylons leads to the downfall of the Twelve Colonies.  The Cylons themselves are a memorable and formidable enemy (that iconic swooshing red LED ‘eye’ later repeated in another of Glen A. Larson’s creations, Knight Rider).  They are commanded by the mysterious Imperious Leader, voiced by Patrick MacNee (famous for his role as John Steed in cult British fantasy spy series The Avengers) who also narrates Galactica’s opening monologue and would go on to play Count Iblis in the “War of the Gods” two-parter.

Battlestar Galactica was blessed with a large production budget (which ultimately lead to the cancellation of the series after 21 episodes, although it was shortly revived as the risible Galactica 1980) and thus for a late 70s SF television production the special effects for the time are fairly impressive – no small wonder given that they were produced under the supervision of Star Wars effects maestro John Dykstra – and numerous space battle sequences keep the viewer engaged in between the drama as the Galactica and the rag-tag fleet of survivors head out into deep space and on to their search to find Earth.  “Saga of a Star World” unfolds at a steady pace, following the opening decimation of the Colonies time is taken to flesh out the characters and deal with the crisis the survivors face in the wake of the Cylon attack.  Given the protracted running time it can feel a little slow in places but the pace picks up after the Galactica’s sojourn to a casino planet, whose hosts harbour a terrifying secret (adding a touch of horror to otherwise family-friendly proceedings) and leads into an action packed finale as Apollo and his fellow pilots take on the pursuing Cylon fleet.

This is Disco-era SF TV so there’s an element of camp when viewed today that may need to be excused on occasion but taken in context and with an open mindset the original Battlestar Galactica is actually quite a lot of fun and through its adventurous spirit and likeable characters it doesn’t fail to entertain and no doubt for viewers at the time, scratched that Star Wars itch.

Geek fact!

An edited version of “Saga of a Star World” was subsequently released theatrically and is available on home video as Battlestar Galactica: The Movie.

Elsewhere on WordPress, you can read the insightful Starloggers anniversary tribute to Battlestar GalacticaBattlestar Galactica: The TV Space Saga Turns 40

TV Review: ‘Falling Skies’ S5 EP10 “Reborn” – SERIES FINALE

This review contains SPOILERS

Starring:  Noah Wylie as Tom Mason, Moon Bloodgood as Anne Glass, Will Patton as Dan Weaver, Colin Cunnigham as Pope, Drew Roy as Hal Mason, Connor Jessup as Ben Mason, Maxim Night as Matt Mason, Sarah Carter as Maggie, Doug Jones as Cochise.

Series created by:  Robert Rodat

Episode Directed by:  Olatunde Osunsanmi / Written by:  David Eick / aired in the UK:  01/09/15

What’s this episode about?

Tom Mason and the 2nd Mass head for Washington DC and their final battle with the Espheni…

In review

After five seasons and fifty two episodes, the Steven Spielberg produced alien invasion saga Falling Skies has concluded its run with, sadly, more of a fizzle than the resounding bang viewers would have hoped for.  The series was arguably at its height during the second and third seasons and although former Battlestar Galactica exec David Eick took over the reins for seasons four and five, the show, although still entertaining, began to ‘level out’ creatively.

After a protracted (and all too often sidestepped) build up towards the series finale, “Reborn” felt a little rushed and Eick’s script too convenient in resolving the show’s storylines.  Season four benefitted from an ever-so-slightly extended run of twelve episodes and what was really needed here was similar treatment and a double-length finale that could’ve allowed more time to focus on those final characters moments.  It’s unfortunate that what little moments there are in “Reborn” are not fully developed and reduced to throwaway dialogue – Hal’s proposal to Maggie in the heat of battle springs to mind as a primary example.  It’s also a shame that a ragged biker group of ‘Mason militias’ lead by Jeff Fahey (Lost’s Frank Lapidus) were introduced, only to become quickly side-lined and no doubt due to time and budget we didn’t get to see the overall battle as the final push to Washington DC was made.

To be fair, there’s a decent amount of tension as Tom Mason and his team navigate the egg-filled underground service tunnels (with plenty of not so subtle riffing off of Alien and Aliens) in an effort to reach the Lincoln Memorial.  Tom’s fateful encounter with the Espheni queen (voiced by Battlestar Galactica’s Tricia Helfer) proved equally exciting, despite the shoe-horned and contrived (even unnecessary?) reasoning for the Espheni invasion and the all too easy defeat of the alien forces that literally went ‘poof’ once the queen fell.

Yet, the real drama of the episode falls a little flat with the ‘death’ of Anne quickly reversed thanks to Tom’s pleas to the Dornia (the intriguing new alien creature now seeming like nothing more than a MacGuffin) and an all too brief final stand-off with Pope a disservice to the ever-excellent Colin Cunningham.  All this said, the closing scenes of “Reborn” (and the series itself) left us with a hopeful outcome that evoked the spirit of Gene Rodenberry and lessons to be learned in these times of conflict, distrust and intolerance.  Many would criticise Falling Skies for it’s perceived over sentimentality but for this viewer at least it was a fitting close to an otherwise flawed series finale.

The bottom line:  Falling Skies goes out with less of a bang than one would hope for in a flawed series finale that still delivers some entertaining moments.

What did you think of the Falling Skies finale?  Share your thoughts below!

Tom Mason (Noah Wylie) prepares for the final push in the series finale of 'Falling Skies'.

Tom Mason (Noah Wylie) prepares for the final push in the series finale of ‘Falling Skies’.