Flashback: ‘Superman II’

It’s Superman vs. General Zod in the 1980 sequel to ‘Superman: The Movie’…

Christopher Reeve returns as the Man of Steel in ‘Superman II’ (image credit: Warner Bros. Pictures).

Year:  1980

Starring:  Gene Hackman, Christopher Reeve, Terence Stamp, Sarah Douglas, Margot Kidder, Jack O’Halloran, Susannah York

Directed by:  Richard Lester / written by:  Mario Puzo and David & Leslie Newman (Superman created by Jerry Siegel and Joe Shuster)

What’s it about?

Relinquishing his powers to become mortal so that he can be with Lois Lane, Superman soon faces the threat of General Zod and his fellow Kryptonian criminals who have escaped the Phantom Zone…

Retrospective/review

Not quite the classic that Superman: The Movie is, Superman II is still a fun and generally pleasing sequel with its light-hearted, family-orientated and occasionally goofy approach making it a product of its time.  As is now widely known, Superman II began shooting back-to-back with Superman: The Movie under the direction of Richard Donner.  The demands and pressures to get the first Superman completed in time for its December 1978 release resulted in suspension of work on Superman II and mounting tensions between producers Alexander and Ilya Salkind and Donner would see the filmmaker’s departure from the sequel.  This led to Donner being replaced by director Richard Lester who would go on to reshoot much of what Donner had already filmed, establishing a slightly less dramatic and more comic strip tone.

Debuting in time for Christmas of 1980, Superman II sees the return of Christopher Reeve as Clark Kent/Superman who finds he is forced to reveal his true identity to an increasingly suspicious Lois Lane (Margot Kidder) and decides to relinquish his powers in order for the pair to be together.  It’s a sacrifice that comes at a cost when Kryptonian criminal General Zod and his cohorts are released from imprisonment in the Phantom Zone (as per the opening act of Superman: The Movie) and arrive on Earth, the yellow sun’s radiation blessing them with super abilities.  Realising his advantage, Zod sets about subjugating the people of Earth and seeks vengeance against the son of his jailor, Jor-El – Superman himself!  The de-powered Man of Steel has no choice but to find a way to defeat Zod before it’s too late.

Superman II is pure comic book entertainment of a simpler time and whilst inferior to Superman: The Movie it’s a highly enjoyable follow-up.  Unsurprisingly, Christopher Reeve shines as the Man of Steel with all the confidence, nobility and humanity audiences expected.  Margot Kidder likewise puts in another sparky performance as the determined Lois Lane and shares great chemistry with Reeve.  Terence Stamp is excellent in the role of General Zod, with a lighter take on the villain that can’t really compare to the fiercer and more formidable version portrayed by Michael Shannon in Man of Steel but Stamp brings gravitas and a believability to the character and together with Sarah Douglas’ uber femme fatale, Ursa, and Jack O’Halloran’s hulking mute, Non, provide a suitable threat to challenge Superman.  The central hero has more than ‘just’ a trio of Kryptonian adversaries to contend with as Superman II brings back Gene Hackman (once more receiving top-billing) for another enjoyably sinister turn as the devious Lex Luthor, who having escaped prison (facilitating a cameo by Ned Beatty as the bumbling Otis) locates Superman’s Fortress of Solitude and unlocks its secrets, then seeks to form an alliance with Zod to achieve his own villainous ends.

Terence Stamp stars as General Zod in ‘Superman II’ (image credit: Warner Bros. Pictures).

The script from Mario Puzo and David & Leslie Newman is fun, balancing humour, drama and action with numerous heart-felt moments.  Whilst some of the effects work now appear a little dated, the action sequences remain engaging under Richard Lester’s capable direction – especially Superman’s battle with Zod in the heart of Metropolis and the climactic face-off in the Fortress of Solitude.  There are some odd abilities on display in terms of powers – Zod’s telekinetic eye beams, the Kryptonians’ game of teleportation during that aforementioned showdown in the Fortress of Solitude and of course, Superman’s throwable chest symbol (affectionately parodied in the hit animated comedy, Family Guy)…a little bizarre, but not totally ridiculous when considered alongside Silver Age Superman comics.  The resolution to the restoration of Superman’s powers is a little quick and convenient as is the amnesia kiss Clark employs to erase Lois’s knowledge of his identity, acting as a reset button for further instalments.  These are all little moments that although a tad silly, have their charm if accepted at face value and taken in the right context.

In 2006, Warner Bros. Home Video would release Superman II: The Richard Donner Cut, where all of the footage shot by Richard Donner would be restored and edited with the gaps filled in by sequences from Richard Lester’s theatrical version of the film, screen test footage and some CGI elements.  In a number of ways it’s a superior version, not in the least for the restoration of scenes with Marlon Brando’s Jor-El (replaced by Susannah York as Lara-El in the theatrical version to avoid having to pay Brando another hefty fee), a more serious tone and the incorporation of music by John Williams from Superman: The Movie.  It’s definitely worth checking out but the at times cumbersome assembly of the cut (Donner’s Superman II was after all an incomplete production) leaves it feeling less definitive and admittedly there are some moments from Lester’s film that are arguably better…Superman asking Zod if he’d care to “step outside” has much more impact than the original line regarding “freedom of the press”, a small but significant example.  There’s no doubt that if Donner had been able to complete his version of Superman II back in 1980 there’s every chance that it would have been something special but as it stands the Donner Cut is a curiosity that’s a treat for fans to be able to experience.

Superman II is solid entertainment and despite falling short of the high bar set by Superman: The Movie is a worthy sequel to a beloved classic and a comic book adventure that’s suitable viewing for all ages.

Geek fact!

Appearing in Superman II is the late Shane Rimmer, voice of Scott Tracy in Gerry Anderson’s classic puppet series Thunderbirds and would also go on to have a small role in Christopher Nolan’s Batman Begins.

All images herein remain the property of the copyright owners and are used for illustrative purposes only.

It’s a Classic: ‘The Twilight Zone’ – “Nightmare at 20,000 Feet”

Looking at some of the best pop culture offerings in film, TV and comics…

“There’s a man out there!”

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William Shatner provides a wonderfully anxious performance in the classic ‘Twilight Zone’ outing “Nightmare at 20,000 Feet” (image credit: CBS Viacom).

Year:  1963

Starring:  William Shatner, Christine White, Ed Kemmer, Asa Maynor, Nick Cravat (introduction/narration by Rod Serling)

Written by:  Richard Matheson / directed by:  Richard Donner / series created by:  Rod Serling

What’s it about?

A man, flying home having just recovered from a breakdown is convinced he can see someone or something on the wing of the aeroplane…

In review:  why it’s a classic

One of the greatest and most popular episodes of The Twilight Zone, “Nightmare at 20,000 Feet” is amongst the best not to be written by series creator Rod Serling.  Penned by noted science fiction writer Richard Matheson (author of I Am Legend and a regular contributor to The Twilight Zone, having previously written memorable episodes such as “Third from the Sun”, “The Invaders” and “Steel”) – adapted from his 1961 story Alone by Night – and helmed by future Superman: The Movie director Richard Donner, “Nightmare at 20,000 Feet” features a pre-Star Trek William Shatner (who also starred in another Matheson scripted story for The Twilight Zone: the excellent 1960 episode “Nick of Time”) as Robert Wilson, a man flying back home on a stormy night with his wife (played by Christine White) after recovering from a nervous breakdown.  During the flight, as his wife sleeps, Wilson observes something outside the window – a strange figure on the wing of the plane that subsequently disappears.  As the figure – a gremlin-like creature – reappears, only to jump away before anyone else can see it, Wilson is convinced it is causing damage to the aircraft and desperately tries to convince his wife and the flight crew what he’s witnessed is real – but nobody believes him.

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The gremlin creature (Nick Cravat), given a suitably creepy facial make-up design by William Tuttle (image credit: CBS Viacom).

Richard Matheson provides a suitably mysterious and tense script that’s enhanced greatly by an increasingly anxious performance from William Shatner.  The tight close-ups and low angle shots employed by Richard Donner’s direction add to the sense of unease and help capture the exasperation and nervousness of Shatner’s reactions, you truly believe this is a man on edge, having already suffered through his own emotional issues and thrust unwittingly into a fantastic scenario that he faces alone – a common but always enjoyable theme in Matheson’s writing.  The general look of the ’gremlin’ may now appear a little dated with the plump and fluffy boiler suit costume, yet the monstrous make-up design by William Tuttle is still very effective and with the strange animal-like movements by actor Nick Cravat makes it appropriately creepy.

Whilst the fifth and final season of The Twilight Zone is generally considered as its weakest (and even then, it yielded some firm fan favourites), “Nightmare at 20,000 Feet” is rightly praised and beloved.  It’s the one that even the most casual of pop culture observers recognises, affectionately parodied on The Simpsons and remade twice (a third time if you count the 2002 radio drama adaptation with Smallville’s John Schneider) – firstly for a segment of 1983’s The Twilight Zone:  The Movie (starring John Lithgow and directed by Mad Max’s George Miller) and more recently as an episode of the Jordan Peele-fronted revival of the series, the retitled story “Nightmare at 30,000 Feet”.

Although “Nightmare at 20,000 Feet” doesn’t feature a traditional rug-pulling twist that more often than not would conclude an edition of The Twilight Zone, it does leave the viewer with an unsettling final shot as the episode fades out with Rod Serling’s wonderfully lyrical closing narration to an all-time classic outing for the celebrated science fiction/fantasy anthology series.

Standout moment

As his flight home weathers a raging storm, Bob Wilson looks out of the window and between flashes of lightning is convinced he can see someone moving about on the wing…

Geek fact!

Richard Matheson would go on to write for the first season of Gene Roddenberry’s Star Trek, scripting the iconic 1966 episode “The Enemy Within”.

If you like this then check out:

The Twilight Zone – “Nick of Time” : William Shatner makes his first TZ appearance in another classic instalment written by Richard Matheson in which a pair of newlyweds find their fates controlled by an ominous fortune telling machine.

Image(s) used herein are utilised for illustrative purposes only and remain the property of the copyright owner(s).

It’s a Classic: ‘Superman: The Movie’

Looking at some of the best pop culture offerings in film, TV and comics…

“Y-you’ve got me? Who’s got you?!”

Superman 78

The unforgettable Christopher Reeve as the iconic Man of Steel (image credit: Warner Bros. Pictures, used for illustrative purposes only).

Year:  1978

Starring:  Marlon Brando, Gene Hackman, Christopher Reeve, Ned Beatty, Jackie Cooper, Glenn Ford, Margot Kidder, Terence Stamp, Susannah York, Marc McClure

Directed by:  Richard Donner / written by:  Mario Puzo, David Newman, Leslie Newman & Robert Bento (story by Mario Puzo)

What’s it about?

Fearing his world is on the verge of destruction, an alien scientist sends his young son into space.  Arriving on Earth, the infant Kal-El grows up to discover he has great powers and becomes humanity’s greatest hero and protector…

In review:  why it’s a classic

Just as Superman himself celebrates the 80th Anniversary of his first appearance in Action Comics #1 (courtesy of creators Jerry Siegel and Joe Shuster), 2018 also marks 40 years of director Richard Donner’s Superman – more commonly known as Superman: The Movie – the character’s first major silver screen outing.  Whilst parts of the film might now seem a bit camp when viewed in these more complex times, the film’s spirit is non-the-less timeless and Superman remains a landmark achievement that set the standards for which comic book film adaptations continue to strive toward.

Superman opens on the doomed world of Krypton as the warnings of the planet’s imminent destruction from Jor-El, one of Krypton’s leading scientists, are ignored.  Sending his baby son into the depths of space as Krypton crumbles to its death, Superman moves into more traditional comic book fantasy as the infant Kal-El arrives on Earth where he is found by the kind and loving Jonathan and Martha Kent.  Kal-El is subsequently raised by the Kent’s as their son Clark, who in his teenage years discovers his true origins and abilities and embarks on a journey to utilise his gifts for good as champion of truth, justice and ‘the American Way’.

It’s a first class production, with a strong story – from The Godfather’s Mario Puzo no less – and screenplay (which received uncredited re-writes from Bond screenwriter Tom Mankiewicz), coupled with epic visuals and a cast which includes cinematic legends Marlon Brando and Gene Hackman – all brought forth confidently under the masterful direction of The Omen’s Richard Donner.  John Barry’s incredible set-design and the pioneering special effects add further to the majesty of Superman.

A huge part of Superman’s success is down to Christopher Reeve, whose performance as Krypton’s Last Son is unforgettable.  Reeve embodies the core principles that drive the iconic hero with strength (both emotional and physical) and believability, whilst conveying strokes of vulnerability that humanise the character.  Likewise, his quirky portrayal of the bumbling, bespectacled Daily Planet reporter Clark Kent is fun and endearing.

Margot Kidder is the quintessential Lois Lane for the era, plucky, headstrong and determined and has great interplay with Reeve, whether it’s in scenes with Clark Kent or Superman.  The supporting cast is bolstered by memorable performances from Jackie Cooper as Daily Planet ‘Chief’ Perry White, Marc McClure as budding photographer Jimmy Olsen, Glenn Ford as Jonathan Kent and of course an introductory role for Terence Stamp as General Zod, who would return to cause trouble in Superman II.

Marlon Brando (who received top-billing along with a hefty $7 million fee), through his scenes in the grand, almost Shakespearean opening act and his later appearances as a hologram in Superman’s Fortress of Solitude, delivers his portrayal of Jor-El with nobility, intelligence and an inherent goodness – qualities that, along with his upbringing by Ma and Pa Kent, would inform the character of Superman.  Gene Hackman brings an enjoyable measure of menace to Superman’s nemesis and self-proclaimed criminal genius Lex Luthor in an amusingly pompous performance.  His evil deeds are aided by the incompetent Otis, played by Deliverance star Ned Beatty.

Any discussion about Superman: The Movie would be remiss without mention of John Williams’ legendary score, indisputably one of the all-time greatest motion picture soundtracks – without which the film would simply be incomplete.  Williams’ soaring, spine-tingling Superman theme is obviously the highlight and one of the most instantly recognisable and celebrated pieces of film music.

35 years later, Zack Snyder’s Man of Steel would thrust Superman into the modern era with a more layered and introspective approach but there will always be a certain kind of innocence and magic that comes with Superman: The Movie and its legacy continues to endure.

Standout moment

A helicopter accident leaves Lois Lane dangling from atop of the Daily Planet building, about to plummet to the ground.  As crowds gather on the streets below, Clark Kent decides he must take action…Superman swoops in to save the day.

Geek fact!

Richard Donner would revisit Superman: The Movie for a 2001 ‘Special Edition’ which restores eight minutes of footage originally cut from the theatrical release.  An overlong (at 188 minutes), yet interesting 1980 TV version was recently released on home video.

If you like this then check out…

Superman II : director Richard Lester takes over for an inferior but fun sequel that pits Terence Stamp’s Zod against Christopher Reeve’s Man of Steel.

Superman Returns : Bryan Singer’s love letter to Donner’s Superman has its flaws but is seen as a spiritual successor and worth considering as a tribute to the classic 1978 original.