Comic Review: ‘Civil War II’ #8

Written by:  Brian Michael Bendis / pencilled by:  David Marquez

What’s it about?

As the visions of Ulysses become more intense, Tony Stark and Carol Danvers face off with the future of the entire superhero community at stake…

In review

After numerous delays, Marvel’s blockbuster event draws to a close with the extra-sized final issue of Civil War II.  Showing great promise in its first couple of issues, Civil War II quickly slid comfortably into a by-the-numbers comic event rhythm.  That being said, the event did produce some standout moments (the vision of Miles Morales’ Spider-Man killing Steve Rogers’ Captain America on the steps of Capitol Hill being particularly vivid and unnerving) and David Marquez’s art has elevated each instalment above mediocrity, but on the whole it failed to be anywhere near as ground-breaking as Mark Millar and Steve McNiven’s original Civil War.

In favour of this final issue, Brian Michael Bendis and David Marquez deliver some exciting edge-of-the-seat action with Bendis maintaining the tension and drama and Marquez presenting his amazingly detailed, blockbuster visuals as the conflict between Tony Stark/Iron Man and Carol Danvers/Captain Marvel reaches its climax.  As with previous issues the moral debate is touched upon but never fully explored (a shame considering the strength of some of Bendis’ other work) and ultimately taking a backseat to those aforementioned blockbuster elements.

Given that the delays Civil War II has faced meant its finale following the release of several relaunched ‘Marvel Now!’ titles, the conclusion – specifically the fate of Tony Stark – is unsurprising given what we’ve seen in Infamous Iron Man and Invincible Iron Man but it non-the-less still carries some dramatic weight as the path is paved for the future of the Marvel Universe.  Perhaps that’s where the problem lies, with the need to establish the status quo of Marvel’s latest line-wide shake-up it’s left less room from Brian Bendis to really delve into the commentary of Civil War II.

In the end, taken as a whole Civil War II was an enjoyable albeit undemanding blockbuster event that is unlikely to be heralded as a classic in years to come but may still be worthy of a revisit when the dust has settled.  It’s not the greatest story Marvel has delivered in recent years but it’s also far from the weakest.

The bottom line:  Whilst Civil War II ultimately failed to live up to the potential of its premise, this final issue succeeds in delivering some great moments of action and drama with a fitting conclusion that establishes the future of the Marvel U.

Civil War II #8 is published by Marvel Comics and is available in print and digital formats now.

Marvel's grand event comes to a close in the final issue of Civil War II (cover art by David Marquez).

Marvel’s grand event comes to a close in the final issue of Civil War II (cover art by David Marquez).

Film Review: ‘Rogue One: A Star Wars Story’ (spoiler free)

Starring:  Felicity Jones, Diego Luna, Alan Tudyk, Donnie Yen, Wen Jiang, Ben Mendelsohn, Forest Whitaker, Riz Ahmed, Mads Mikkelsen

Directed by:  Gareth Edwards / Written by:  Chris Wietz & Tony Gilroy (story by John Knoll & Gary Whitta) / 134 minutes

What’s it about?

Rescued from imprisonment, Jyn Erso is enlisted by the Rebel Alliance for a mission that will lead to the retrieval of the plans for the ‘Death Star’, the Empire’s new planet-killing weapon…

In review

Following the colossal success of The Force Awakens, Rogue One sees Disney/Lucasfilm unleash the first of their standalone ‘Star Wars Story’ anthology films to help sate the cravings of audiences whilst they await Episode VIII.  Such a project could easily be labelled as greedy and corporate minded, but luckily Rogue One proves its worth as a satisfying and engaging addition to the Star Wars universe.

Set prior to the opening events of 1977’s Star Wars – now retroactively known as Episode IV: A New HopeRogue One slots comfortably between the prequel trilogy and those much beloved and iconic original films without feeling contrived or unnecessary as it embellishes A New Hope by telling the story of the Rebel Alliance’s daring mission to retrieve the plans for the ‘Death Star’, the evil Empire’s new devastating, planet-killing weapon.  Felicity Jones (The Theory of Everything) is a strong and capable lead as convict-turned-Rebel ally Jyn Erso, daughter of Imperial Scientist Galen Erso (Mads Mikkelsen) who, together with Rebel Captain Cassian Andor (Diego Luna) assembles a rag-tag band of fighters including Chirrut Imwe (Donnie Yen), a blind man who is strong with the force, his companion Baze Malbus (Wen Jiang) and defecting Imperial pilot Bodhi Rook (Riz Ahmed) to battle against Ben Medelsohn’s Orson Krennic and the forces of the Galactic Empire.

Whilst Jones and Luna are clear standouts and best served by the screenplay’s characterisation, it’s reprogrammed Imperial droid K-2SO – voiced by Firefly’s Alan Tudyk – that often steals the show with a snarky and cantankerous attitude that provides much of the film’s dark humour and even some of its heart and soul.  Mads Mikkelsen (most recently providing the villainy in Marvel’s Doctor Strange) makes the most of his limited screen time but at least gets to make more of an impression than Forest Whitaker who is criminally underused as the gruff Rebel fighter Saw Gerrera, a face from the Erso’s past who would’ve warranted further development along with Jyn’s earlier years to further flesh out her ‘rebellious’ backstory.  Small quibbles aside, despite a slightly sluggish start Rogue One jumps to hyperspace once we get to the central plot, sending the viewer on an epic, action-packed ride that makes amends for any earlier narrative shortfalls and pacing issues.

This is most definitely still a Star Wars film yet one that is more grounded in the nitty gritty of warfare (with subtle shades of Saving Private Ryan and Platoon) and doesn’t shy away from the grey areas of ‘good vs evil’, the more mystical elements of the franchise mostly restricted to Imwe’s sporadic ramblings concerning the force.  It’s certainly all in the favour of Rogue One, mining some largely unexplored territory that enriches it all the more.

Director Gareth Edwards (Godzilla) stages some incredibly exciting and visually impressive set pieces that easily rival the action of The Force Awakens, much like what J.J. Abrams achieved there’s a real sense of heft and physicality to the film’s elaborate space battles as well as its ground focused combat as Rebel soldiers take on the Empire’s Stormtroopers and X-Wings swoop in to tackle Imperial walkers.

Rogue One not only looks great but also via its production design and costumes faithfully replicates the era of A New Hope as it was created by George Lucas and his team back in 1977.  Yes, it can still be taken as a standalone story but for fans of Star Wars, it’s actually Rogue One’s connectivity to the overall universe and saga – complemented by numerous easter eggs and lashings of fan service (some more pleasing than others, with the inclusion of Darth Vader handled particularly well) – that is perhaps one of its greatest appeals.

The bottom line:  The Star Wars franchise continues confidently with the highly enjoyable and epically realised Rogue One, providing plenty of excitement for fans and casual viewers alike.

Rogue One: A Star Wars Story is in cinemas now.

Felicity Jones leads a rebellious bunch against the Empire in Disney/Lucasfilm's 'Rogue One: A Star Wars Story'.

Jyn Erso (Felicity Jones) leads a rebellious bunch against the Empire in Disney/Lucasfilm’s ‘Rogue One: A Star Wars Story’.

DVD Review: ‘Doctor Who’ – “The Power of the Daleks”

Starring:  Patrick Troughton, Michael Craze, Anneke Wills, Bernard Archard, Robert James

Written by: David Whitaker and Dennis Spooner / directed by: Christopher Barry

What’s it about?

Whilst Ben and Polly try to come to terms with the sudden change in the Doctor’s form, their arrival at a human colony on the planet Vulcan leads to a terrifying discovery that brings the Doctor face to face with an old enemy…

In review

As fans are all too aware, the BBC – with a painful lack of foresight – wiped their original master tapes of almost 100 episodes of classic Doctor Who.  Over the years fan recordings of video and audio have allowed these lost stories to be restored and live on either as audio books (with linking narrations) or remastered home video releases of various serials, some of which have been completed using animated versions of missing episodes.

Arriving in time for the 50th anniversary of its original (and only) television broadcast, The Power of the Daleks is brought to life thanks to a combination of the remastered audio track with animation and for die-hard fans of classic Who it’s quite a treat.  The story is iconic for various reasons, most significantly that it introduces the Second Doctor and that it pits him against his greatest foe – the Daleks.  Troughton’s performance as the ‘renewed’ (the term regeneration would not be established until Jon Pertwee’s tenure as the Third Doctor) version of the Doctor is sublime as he effortlessly switches between mumbling eccentricity, sparks of intellectualism and sporadic instances of the downright barmy – all to the befuddlement and even frustration of companions Ben (Michael Craze) and Polly (Anneke Wills).  There’s a real sense of growth in characterisation across the serial’s six episodes, with Troughton establishing a satisfying rhythm as the Doctor settles into his new form and likewise, Ben and Polly start to become familiar with and trusting of their new – yet old – friend.

Beyond characterisation, writers David Whitaker and Dennis Spooner craft an atmospheric and, in later instalments, reasonably tense tale as the Daleks utilise deceit, masquerading as ‘servants’ to exploit the scientists and bureaucrats of Vulcan to their own devious ends.  This is certainly one of the great Dalek stories and a strong Doctor Who adventure overall.

In terms of the animation itself, it’s fairly limited (and if you own DVDs of The Tenth Planet, The Moonbase or The Invasion then you’ll know what to expect) yet this often works in the favour of The Power of the Daleks providing it with a level of old school charm that evokes the period from which it originates and the blending of CGI with traditional hand drawn cell animation gives the Daleks themselves a slick range of motion that actually eliminates some of the clunkiness that the manually operated live action studio models would tend to produce.

Fans of modern Doctor Who will find The Power of the Daleks to be a strange and markedly different experience and it’s drawn out pace and moments of inaction will likely be testing.  Admittedly, like a lot of classic Who serials the story could have been tightened to four episodes but it’s an ultimately gripping and enjoyable journey thanks to some great acting from Troughton and the building of tension and excitement as the Daleks’ latest plan for conquest gradually unfolds.

On the DVD:  Various special features are included, comprising episode commentaries, a making of documentary, animation and photo gallery, PDF extras, surviving footage reel, telesnap reconstruction and more.

The bottom line:  One of the most iconic classic Doctor Who stories is lovingly restored thanks to a wonderfully kitsch presentation combining audio with animation.  Although modern viewers will struggle with its slow pace, every fan should check out The Power of the Daleks.

The Power of the Daleks is available on DVD in the UK now.  The serial is also being broadcast by BBC Worldwide.

"The Power of the Daleks" : a lost classic 'Doctor Who' story now restored by the BBC via a combiation of animation and original audio.

“The Power of the Daleks” : a lost classic ‘Doctor Who’ story now restored by the BBC via a combiation of animation and original audio.

Film Review: ‘Doctor Strange’ (spoiler free)

Mighty Marvel casts its spell…

Starring:  Benedict Cumberbatch, Chiwetel Ejiofor, Rachel McAdams, Benedict Wong, Tilda Swinton, Mads Mikkelsen.

Directed by:  Scott Derrickson / Written by:  Jon Spaihts, Scott Derrickson & C. Robert Cargill / 115 minutes

What’s it about?

His hands mangled in a car crash, brilliant neurosurgeon Stephen Strange’s career is seemingly over.  Exhausting all surgical efforts to repair his injuries, Strange travels to a place called Kamar-Taj where an encounter with a mysterious figure sees him thrust into the world of the mystic arts…

In review

With the runaway successes of Guardians of the Galaxy and Ant-Man, Marvel Studios have proved adept at bringing lesser and more obscure comic book properties to the big screen and in a manner that manages to please fans and regular audiences alike.  Doctor Strange would immediately seem a far trickier and more daring gamble than those previous hits but for the most part, Marvel Studios succeed once more.

Based on the Marvel comic books by Stan Lee and Steve Ditko, the journey of neurosurgeon Doctor Stephen Strange from arrogance to fall from grace and eventual redemption may be a little clichéd but via the film’s exploration of magical abilities and mystic realms there lies another dimension to the storytelling that opens up the possibilities for future Marvel Studios productions.  It’s fair to say in that sense that this makes the “Sorcerer Supreme” an important character as the looming apex of Avengers: Infinity War approaches.

In the role of Stephen Strange, Benedict Cumberbatch makes for a strong lead and although for some it may take a little time to adjust to his American accent, the Sherlock and Star Trek Into Darkness star laps up the material handed to him in a performance that’s impassioned, witty and by the end of it all, noble.  Seemingly the requisite love interest, Rachel McAdams is somewhat underserved as Christine Palmer although she does share some vital scenes with Cumberbatch that helps the audience become more invested in the character and his arc throughout this origin story.

Tilda Swinton is wise and otherworldly as the enigmatic Ancient One and co-stars Chiwetel Ejiofor and Benedict Wong fit nicely into the mix as fellow sorcerers Mordo and Wong respectively.  As the main antagonist, Mads Mikkelsen’s Kaecilius – a former pupil seeking to unlock the secrets of dark magic –  has some great moments, rising to the challenge of being pitted against the talents of Cumberbatch and Swinton but is ultimately less memorable than Hugo Weaving’s Red Skull (Captain America: The First Avenger) or James Spader’s Ultron (Avengers: Age of Ultron).

There’s a slight over reliance on humour at times, parts of it are welcome relief but some moments feel forced, included merely for the sake of it and arguably undermine several key scenes that would have benefitted from a more dramatic tone.  Where Doctor Strange really excels is via its jaw-dropping, kaleidoscopic visuals as director Scott Derrickson intertwines influences of Escher with the cinematic awe of Inception and the mesmerising psychedelia of 2001: A Space Odyssey that bring the trippy imaginings of Messrs. Lee and Ditko breathtakingly to life.  The extra expense of an IMAX 3D ticket is fully warranted for the fullest possible immersion in the mind-bending spectacle of folding cityscapes and unravelling astral planes.

Ultimately it’s the visual elements that gloss over the overall flaws in the tone and narrative of Doctor Strange but there’s no denying the charm of Benedict Cumberbatch’s performance and the potential of further adventures of Marvel’s Master of the Mystic Arts.

The bottom line:  Despite some formulaic elements and jarring moments of silliness, Doctor Strange is a reliably entertaining and visually stunning addition to the Marvel Cinematic Universe.

Doctor Strange is screening in UK cinemas now and opens in the US and worldwide from 4th November.

Benedict Cumberbatch confidently leads Marvel Studios' 'Doctor Strange'.

Benedict Cumberbatch confidently leads Marvel Studios’ ‘Doctor Strange’.

Quick Thoughts: DC TV Season Premieres

With the current seasons of the CW’s DC Comics based television shows already underway in the States, this week saw the return of Supergirl, The Flash and Arrow to UK screens.  Presented here is a quick look at the season premiere of each series…

 Supergirl

Season 2 Premiere:  “The Adventures of Supergirl”

Starring:  Melissa Benoist, Mehcad Brooks, Chyler Leigh, David Harewood, Calista Flockhart, Jeremy Jordan, Tyler Hoechlin

Episode Directed by:  Glen Winter / Written by:  Andrew Kreisberg & Jessica Queller

With the future of the series secured by the transition from CBS to the CW, Supergirl makes an assured return with some small changes (including a new base of operations for the DEO) and one ‘Super’ addition (more on that in a moment).  It’s more or less business as usual with Melissa Benoist the ever likeable lead in an episode that’s fun and action packed (aided by some impressive visual effects) with plenty of fan pleasing references to comic book mythology.  There’s still an element of emotional angst (mainly via Kara and James Olsen’s friendship/relationship dilemma) that’ll irk some viewers, but will certainly appeal to the young adult demographic.

Of course, it’s the introduction of Tyler Hoechlin as Clark Kent/Superman that’s been most anticipated and proves to be the biggest highlight.  Much like the series itself it’s an optimistic and nostalgic take on the character that melds Hoechlin’s enjoyable performance with dashes of Christopher Reeve – with a plethora of callbacks to Richard Donner’s Superman throughout to hammer home that point.  It’s great that the producers have finally been allowed to fully include the Man of Steel, thus addressing the awkward elephant in the room that plagued last season and the solid chemistry between Benoist and Hoechlin makes their scenes together all the more pleasing, whether in their Kryptonian guises or not.  Hopefully there’ll be plenty more opportunities for Hoechlin to return throughout the series.

 The Flash

Season 3 Premiere:  “Flashpoint”

Starring:  Grant Gustin, Candice Patton, Danielle Panabaker, Carlos Valdes, Jesse L. Martin, Keiynan Lonsdale

Episode directed by:  Jesse Warn / Written by:  Andrew Kreisberg & Brooke Roberts

Inspired by the comic book storyline of the same name, “Flashpoint” opens with Barry living a happy, Flash-less life after the darkness and turmoil he experienced in season 2…achieved by him travelling back in time to prevent his mother’s murder at the hands of the Reverse-Flash.

Time travel and alternate timelines is not something new to The Flash but in this one the super heroics are left to ‘Kid’ Flash Wally West (allowing Keiynan Lonsdale to step-up) whilst Barry treasures his new life in a world where both his parents are alive.  Grant Gustin gets to play the brighter and breezier version of his character here and the new timeline also gives us some welcome twists on other main characters – most notably Cisco as an egotistical billionaire and Joe West a washed-up shadow of the heroic Detective and father figure we’re familiar with.

Matt Letscher makes a creepy reprisal as the Reverse-Flash but unfortunately the central villain in “Flashpoint” is another, rather generic and uninspired riff on the ‘evil speedster’ in the form of ‘The Rival’ (Todd Lasance) who at least serves a purpose in bringing Barry back into action and facilitating a team up with Wally’s Flash.  What’s sorely missing is the excellent Tom Cavanaugh and seen as he’s been rightfully bumped up to series regular it’ll be interesting to see what’s in store for one of the shows’ greatest assets.

Events taking a dramatic turn, we learn – not unpredictably – that meddling with the timeline has consequences and with Barry’s memories of his previous reality gradually dissipating, this sets the stage for things to come.  Despite this all being done before in The Flash there’s plenty of potential in loosely adapting the Flashpoint storyline and doing so could provide some nifty tweaks to keep the series fresh and enjoyable.

Arrow

Season 5 Premiere:  “Legacy”

Starring:  Stephen Amell, David Ramsey, Willa Holland, Emily Bett Rickards, Echo Kellum, Paul Blackthorne

Episode directed by:  James Bamford / Written by:  Marc Guggenheim & Wendy Mericle

After focusing on metahuman antics and dark mysticism last season, with Damien Darhk defeated and Oliver in place as Mayor of Star City Arrow steps back towards the hardened vigilantism of its earlier days.  Those meta aspects broadened the overall scope of the CW’s DC universe but Arrow is arguably its better self when dealing with bone crunching and corruption and there’s plenty of that in this season premiere.

Stephen Amell slips confidently back into the role of Oliver Queen/Green Arrow and although his mission as the Emerald Archer has reverted to more brutal times, the death of Laurel (Katie Cassidy) and the disbanding of Team Arrow leaves a large shadow and the way “Legacy” addresses this is laudable, via moral debates between Oliver, Thea, Felicity and a grieving Quentin Lance, redeemed by Oliver’s intentions to use official powers to root out police corruption and assemble a special anti-crime unit.

After a number of guest appearances last season, it’s good to see Echo Kellum become part of the regular cast, although it remains to be seen whether the interplay between Felicity and Curtis will be as fun as it was last year or just become plain annoying.

The martial arts action is as slick and exciting as ever (but paling in comparison to the visceral thrills offered by Marvel’s Daredevil) and “Legacy” features some crazy sequences, one of which involves Oliver dangling from a fleeing helicopter.  We’re left with the emerging threat of another Dark Archer-esque villain who will hopefully turn out to be more compelling than The Rival over in The Flash and stand shoulder to shoulder with the likes of Ra’s Al Ghul and Damien Darhk.

Supergirl, The Flash and Arrow air in the UK Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday evenings (respectively) on Sky 1.  US viewers can catch them on the CW.

DC’s Legends of Tomorrow returns to UK screens on Thursday 3rd November, Sky 1.

What did you think of the season premieres of Supergirl, The Flash and Arrow?

Share your thoughts below!

With added 'Supergirl', the CW's DC shows return to UK TV screens...

With added ‘Supergirl’, the CW’s DC shows return to UK TV screens…

Comic Review: ‘Infamous Iron Man’ #1

Written by:  Brian Michael Bendis / pencilled by:  Alex Maleev

What’s it about?

In the fallout of the recent superhero civil war, Victor Von Doom takes up the mantle of Tony Stark to become the new Iron Man…

In review

Following the conclusion of the globe-hopping International Iron Man and in the (impending) wake of Civil War II Brian Michael Bendis reteams with artist Alex Maleev to bring readers Infamous Iron Man, where the reformed Victor Von Doom decides that nature abhors a vacuum and that the world still needs an Iron Man.

Part of the Marvel Now! refresh, Infamous Iron Man continues to follow Von Doom’s path from villain to ‘hero’ set forth by the conclusion of Secret Wars (which left him with a face devoid of that grotesque scarring) and explored initially in Bendis’ first volume of Invincible Iron Man.  Von Doom has always been one of Marvel’s greatest villains and we’ve already seen that there’s plenty of potential for the former Doctor Doom to become an equally compelling hero.

Infamous Iron Man gets things off to a slow, yet interesting start – much as was the case with International Iron Man – and if you’re prepared to forgive the larger focus on exposition there’s much to enjoy here.  It seems that Bendis is merely setting the scene with Von Doom’s motivations kept relatively vague.  Bendis has helped to delicately redefine Von Doom over the last year and it’s an interesting evolution for the character, there’s still a streak of darkness and a restrained hint of ego but there’s an iron will that makes him an appealing successor to Stark.  Touching on the tragedy of Doom’s past (and facilitating the emotional crux of this opening chapter), Bendis manages to delve into the mind of the character whilst maintaining some of the enigma.  It’s certainly going to be interesting to see the layers peel away as the new Iron Man rises.

The art by Alex Maleev is nothing short of superb and neatly fits the tone of the book with dark, scratchy and moody visuals complemented perfectly by Matt Hollingsworth’s muted colour palette.  Fans of Maleev’s work on International Iron Man and Daredevil will not be disappointed.

Minor pacing issues aside, the only real drawback is not down to Infamous Iron Man itself but with the delays to the remaining issues of Civil War II.  There are significant hints as to the fate of Tony Stark but it remains to be seen if the lack of conclusion to that story will creatively hinder this title’s opening arc.  Still, there’s enough mystery and intrigue that will keep Iron Man – and Von Doom – fans reading.

The bottom line:  Despite it’s slow pace, Brian Michael Bendis infuses Infamous Iron Man with plenty of intrigue that together with great art provides enough reason to keep reading.

Infamous Iron Man #1 is published by Marvel Comics and is available in print and digital formats now.

Alex Maleev provides sublime visuals for Marvel Comics' 'Infamous Iron Man'.

Alex Maleev provides sublime visuals for Marvel Comics’ ‘Infamous Iron Man’.

Comic Review: ‘Dead No More: The Clone Conspiracy’ #1

Written by:  Dan Slott / pencils by:  Jim Cheung

What’s this issue about?

With the return of the Jackal, Peter Parker soon finds that the odds are once again against him as he faces demons from the past…

In review

Spilling out of the pages of The Amazing Spider-Man, Dan Slott launches the next Spider-Man event which could prove both surprising and controversial as Peter Parker is set to face ghosts from the past.  Further elaboration would result in spoilers, but needless to say there are certain elements to The Clone Conspiracy presented here that threaten to undo defining events from Spider-Man history, which will either be welcomed or derided in the months to come.

Building on the “Before Dead No More” arc in Slott’s recent ASM issues, Dead No More: The Clone Conspiracy #1 opens at the funeral of Jay Jameson as Peter wrestles with the decisions he’s made and the ongoing mysteries tied to the New U corporation.  Slott sets the scene with some emotionally charged exchanges between Peter and Anna Maria, yet it proves to be a slackly paced opening as the dialogue becomes weighed down by exposition designed to make this series accessible to new readers whilst also serving as a recap for existing ones.  To an extent, it works however there’s a definite sense that those who haven’t been following this current volume of ASM and without some familiarity with previous events such as the Superior Spider-Man run and Spider-Verse (as well as overall Spider-Man history) will ultimately wind up a little lost and less invested in this particular saga than established fans.

Luckily, once the set-up is out of the way and Peter continues his investigations of New U as Spider-Man, Slott’s narrative begins to gather pace and before long thrusts the reader into some wonderfully staged action, culminating in a confrontation with Dead No More’s central villain, the Jackal and a cliffhanger that will leave readers anxiously awaiting more.  It’s in these moments that artist Jim Cheung shines with detailed, cinematic layouts that accentuate the excitement. Some wonky character facials during the early funeral scenes aside, Cheung’s art is a perfect fit for the title – especially if it proves to be pacier in subsequent instalments.

The book closes with a back-up story from Slott with art by Ron Frenz that harkens back to a key, classic Spider-Man story that plays as a fitting tribute to that particular era of comics whilst adding layers to one of The Clone Conspiracy’s biggest twists.

The bottom line:  Dead No More: The Clone Conspiracy #1 is a decent, if slightly uneven start to Dan Slott’s latest Spider-Man saga that certainly shows signs of promise.

Dead No More: The Clone Conspiracy #1 is published by Marvel Comics and is available in print and digital formats now.

Cover art for Marvel's 'Dead No More: The Clone Conspiracy' #1 by Gabriele Dell'Otto.

Cover art for Marvel’s ‘Dead No More: The Clone Conspiracy’ #1 by Gabriele Dell’Otto.